Fuel Heats of Formation, Carbon Atoms, Hydrogen Atoms, Oxygen Atoms & Densities
Fuel Heat of Formation ( J / kmol ) Carbon Hydrogen Oxygen Density ( kg / m^3 )
Ethanol
-277,690,000
2
6.0000
1
789.0
Methanol
-238,666,000
1
4.0000
1
791.5
Gasoline
-208,500,000
8
18.0000
0
702.5
Propane
-122,876,000
3
8.0000
0
510.0
Ethane
-99,320,000
2
6.0000
0
570.0
Methane
-87,049,000
1
4.0000
0
422.4
Kerosene
-24,149,000
1
1.9532
0
800.0
Hydrogen
-8,123,000
0
2.0000
0
70.8
Methylacetylene
162,340,000
3
4.0000
0
700.0
Quadricyclene
302,080,000
7
8.0000
0
985.0

Fuel density is the density of the fuel, commonly expressed in kilograms per cubic meter. The greater the fuel density, the greater the mass of fuel that can be stored in a given tank and the greater the mass of fuel than can be pumped for a given pump. Fuel density generally increases with increasing molecular weight of the fuel molecules. Fuel density also generally increases with increasing molecular weight of the component atoms of the fuel molecules. All else being equal, an increase in density increases the overall performance of rockets, especially pressure fed ones, because tanks are heavy compared to pumps. Fuel density is used to calculate fuel volume ratio, which is in turn used to calculate the tank mass.

fuel volume ratio = fuel mass ratio / fuel density

tank mass = tank pressure * 3.0 / effective tensile * ( fuel volume ratio + oxidizer volume ratio + propellant volume ratio )
 
 

This is used in astropolis, pumped rocket and rocket cost.
 
 

Contact   Rocket   GNU Free Documentation License