Fuel oxidation is the number of electrons that a fuel molecule will tend to take. For rocket fuels this number will be negative. Hydrogen atoms tend to give an electron, carbon atoms tend to give four electrons and oxygen atoms tend to take two electrons. Diatomic hydrogen has two reducing electrons and quadricyclene has thirty six reducing electrons.

In a stoichiometric mixture, the product of reducing electrons in a fuel molecule and fuel molecules will equal the product of oxidizing electrons in an oxidizer molecule and oxidizer molecules. Two molecules of hydrogen with two reducing electrons each mix stoichiometrically with one molecule of oxygen with four oxidizing electrons. One molecule of methane with eight reducing electrons mixes stoichiometrically with two molecules of oxygen with four oxidizing electrons each. One molecule of quadricyclene with thirty six reducing electrons mixes stoichiometrically with nine molecules of oxygen with four oxidizing electrons each. Given fuel carbon, fuel hydrogen and fuel oxygen the fuel oxidation can be calculated which is in turn used along with oxidizer mix oxidation to calculate oxidizer mix molar.

fuel oxidation = 2 * fuel oxygen - 4 * fuel carbon - fuel hydrogen

reactant molar = oxidizer mix oxidation - fuel oxidation
oxidizer mix molar = - fuel oxidation / reactant molar
 
 

This is used in bipropellant rocket, tripropellant rocket, pumped rocket and rocket cost.
 
 

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